HDR Photos2017-07-18T08:20:09+02:00

HDR Photos

  • Author
    Posts
  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    I would like to explore HDR photos more , mainly landscapes.
    I am using the old battleship Canon 1 D MkIV and would like your opinion which aperture increments to use for the three exposures (1/3 — 1/2 — or even 1 aperture steps).
    I am planning to edit later in CS6. I am not a professional but a serious hobbyist.
    Thanks a ton……

  • Jeffreysa
    Participant
    Post count: 287

    Do not change the aperture as this will effect how each image looks. Change shutter speed. I would use at least 1+ stop between exposures.
    Expose for the dark area, normal and expose for the light area. This will determine the increments.

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3704

    Bracket?

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Thanks but I do not need to change apertures.
    The D1 Mk VI allows me to set it for HDR, then allows me to set the number of exposures to be taken and then allows me to set the (aperture) increments for each exposure, i.e 1/3 , 1/2 ,1 , or 2….etc etc).
    When I shoot then with 5 or 10 frames per second, I do not need to manually measure and adjust different exposures (e.g. highlights,lowlights, middle, etc) for each exposure.
    Is there a rule of thumb for highlights/shadows brackets, e.g. 2 or 3 or 4 f-stops between high and low for sun light or shade ???

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Oh what an idiot I am, I could not see the forest for the trees……………………
    Of course I can measure a highlight area and the a dark area of the photo to be taken and then actually see min and max. aperture and then adjust the HDR program accordingly !!!
    The program allows me to determine only different aperture increments per shot, which is mostly ok for landscapes but if one does HDR absolutely manually then the better bet would be shutter speed adjustments…..
    Sorry to have stolen your time……

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    @elsahoffmann 297414 wrote:

    Bracket?

    Hi Elsa, I trust my latest reply clarifies my dilemma and explains my (in this case) befuddled thinking…..
    “Bracket ?” Canon calls it Automatic Exposure Bracketing ……

  • Jeffreysa
    Participant
    Post count: 287

    HDR program in camera will take three shots and output a single jpg file. I don’t think your camera has this.

    AEB, on the other hand, will take three images of different exposures. If you are in Shutter priority it will change the aperture for each image. You do not want this as each image will look different (depth of field), not just the exposure. AEB in aperture priority will change the shutter speed on each image and only the exposure will change. Those images can then be used in CS6.

  • Peter Connan
    Participant
    Post count: 813

    I agree, you must use aperture priority, so that the camera changes shutter speed.

    I don’t measure too much, just shoot a bracketing set and check that I don’t have clipped blacks in the lightest one or clipped brights in the darkest one. If I do, I may either increase the number of shots, the step or the exposure compensation (if clipping only occurs on one end) and try a second batch.

    I try to remember to shoot something else (if working off a tripod this may be a dark frame) so that it’s easy later to figure out where one set ends and the next begins.

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3704

    I am not sure what I am missing – either I dont read well, or I am blond. Or your chosen words are incorrect.

    I don’t get that you would change Aperture at all – (neither would I shoot on Aperture priority – although that is possible)

    I will take an average reading – in MANUAL exposure – eg f11, Shutterspeed 1/160 ISO 100 (as an example)
    The set the camera to BRACKET – here I have the following options:
    1. How many stops (or portions thereof) between the shots (1/3 or 1/5 or 1 stop) (exposure stops not aperture stops)
    2. How many shots to take – eg 3 or 5. if you choose 3 – it gives you one shot at the exposure settings you choose – one shot under exposed (1/3 stop for example) and one shot 1/3 over (exposure not aperture)

    the APERTURE does not change – the shutterspeed or ISO change (depending if you are shooting on AV or M )

    you end up with 3 shots (or 5 or whatever) – choose HDR – tell it which images to use for the HDR (the 3 or 5 shots) – and sit back and wait for the software to do it’s thing.

    it is never Aperture steps you change – it is exposure that changes. Aperture should stay fixed otherwise your DOF will be all over the place.

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Hi Jeff,
    Yes my camera has AEB.
    sory for the big misunderstanding with aperture / exposure.

    The HDR image is not done in camera. I have to use a separate program to create the HDR image.
    Only AEB is done in camera according to pre-determined exposure levels(e.g. -1/3…normal, + 1/3 for each image taken….etc etc)
    Elsa, you are not missing anything…nor are you blonde. I used the wrong expressions. Of course, AEB does not change apertures (that would be fatal) but the exposure……

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3704

    @gerd 297426 wrote:

    Hi Jeff,
    Yes my camera has AEB.
    sory for the big misunderstanding with aperture / exposure.

    The HDR image is not done in camera. I have to use a separate program to create the HDR image.
    Only AEB is done in camera according to pre-determined exposure levels(e.g. -1/3…normal, + 1/3 for each image taken….etc etc)
    Elsa, you are not missing anything…nor are you blonde. I used the wrong expressions. Of course, AEB does not change apertures (that would be fatal) but the exposure……

    Okey so we are clear on the terminology. And believe me – it’s an easy mistake to make – one tends to think of stops in terms of aperture and forget the exposure parts 🙂

    There are several programs one can use for HDR blending – some better than others – I prefer to do this manually – and not with software – but dont claim my method to be better at all. Just be aware that HDR can look very over cooked if done with software – you have to be conservative.

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Thanks everyone for your input.
    I would be interested to know how Elsa does it without any software. Pardon but now I am blonde….

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3704

    Actually you are not blond. Its a fair question and perhaps not everyone will agree with the definition – or should I say have the same understanding of HDR.
    HDR – high dynamic range – to achieve that – you need to capture more details in the highlights, more details in the shadows, and everything in between. Your camera can’t do that in one image (as your grayscale ruler will confirm) – so you shoot 3 exposures – and use the bits of all 3 to build an image with a higher dynamic range. – all the details available in all three – usually with software.

    Due to the limitations of printers and screens, it however gets condenced / consentrated /compressed (tone mapping) which often results in a cooked image – really over the top in terms of “looks”. There is a school of thought (with good merit) that true HDR can not be seen – which means if you cant see it – you haven’t produced it (you cant have a result if you cant see the result)

    Another misconception (in my opinion) is that by doing HDR (increasing dynamic range) – you must increase colour saturation. Not true. Your aim should be to increase the LUMINANCE (light) values. This is where the HDR software (in my opinion) fall short – it usually boosts saturation/colour together with luminance. (Incidentally – this is exactly where the curves adjustment in PS can cook an image – if your blending mode isn’t correct- because you think you change luminance – when in fact you are affecting the colours as well)

    Perhaps one would describe what I do (when I am not lazy- which I usually am) is to manually blend images – and perhaps I should rather say I do blending rather than HDR. Blending by hand takes time, and its not just the blending, its correcting the issues caused by the blending, tending to saturation and what not – and unless you have an image you want to sell to Bill Gates (or the Guptas) it’s probably not worth spending the time on.
    With HDR software you usually get various options to choose from (eg in NIK software) and on top on that – you have sliders with each option to move about – to reduce or increase the effect – which makes it really very user friendly – and you see on the fly what is going on. I do on occasion use NIK – but that occasion might be once in 12 months.

    I am totally open for correction on the above, if anyone has a different view.

  • Jeffreysa
    Participant
    Post count: 287

    @gerd 297428 wrote:

    Thanks everyone for your input.
    I would be interested to know how Elsa does it without any software. Pardon but now I am blonde….

    Hi Gerd
    You must use some software, the difference is if the software does it automatically, which will not give great results as Elsa said, or you do it manually within the software like CS6 giving you full control.

    My aim is always to try to create what the eye sees at the time of pressing the shutter release. As the camera has only a fraction of dynamic range that the human eye has the only way is to take multiple shots and blend them.

    The term HDR can be very miss-leading as it can be done 1)automatically by the camera or 2)automatically by software off camera or 3)manually off camera using something like CS6. Each method is HDR with varying degrees of success.

  • Gerd
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Hi Elsa ,Jeffrey
    Nowadays one must be careful which terminology to use…
    I took Elsa’s comment that she creates HDR images “MANUALLY” as “using no software or CS” and wondered very much HOW she was going to do it, hence my query.
    Thanks Elsa for the explanation.. I am not a professional, so for me whether you fiddle with the luminance or/ and the saturation is maybe not a deciding factor for me —but I agree with your comments re luminance /saturation. What I am looking for is more detailed highlights and dark areas and everything in between WITHOUT OVERCOOKING the image to Kitsch….

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3704

    you and me both with the terminology – I slip up myself 🙂
    (must be our old age haha)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.Log In

People Who Like Thisx

Loading...