D3 and D300 reviews2007-12-03T18:39:24+02:00

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D3 and D300 reviews

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  • Blue Shirt
    Participant
    Post count: 351

    … or why I like Thom Hogan. He has quite a lot to say about the plethora of reviews of the D3 and D300 by armchair enthusiasts. I quote him:

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Are We There Yet?[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Dec 2–Yes, I have my D300 and D3 and new lenses. No, I don’t have much to say about them yet, unlike most Internet sites.Yes, I’ll eventually review them. Yes, I’ll have eBooks on them. But no, I don’t know when either reviews or eBooks will be available. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Seriously, folks: it takes an awful lot of testing and use to flesh out the pluses and minuses of sophisticated new cameras. I’ve been amused as I watch the net chatter about these two key new Nikon products. Half the folk that should know better are gyrating on their postings about the cameras (first it has problems, then they figure them out, then they discover something else that stumps them for awhile, etc.) while the other half have simply made a blatant pronouncement (e.g. “best DSLR ever” or “not substantially different than a D200”).[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Personally, even in just the modest amount of use I’ve been able to perform while traveling, I’ve noticed a lot of small things that require a great deal more investigation before writing about them with authority. I’ve no doubt that these two cameras push Nikon’s DSLR capabilities into new territories, but without being able to say exactly how far we’ve come from where we’ve been, I’ll simply stay quiet. Okay, not exactly quiet.[/FONT]

    Full article.

  • Crunchie007
    Participant
    Post count: 376

    BTW, that is why I will wait a few months before deciding on the D80 -> D300 upgrade I am contemplating. I want to read well-considered, thorough reviews and product tests before deciding, rather than be swept along the tide of internet hype. There is nothing wrong with the quick & dirty reviews that everyone is pushing out, but I will not let that influence my choice right now.

  • KCLouCorbett
    Participant
    Post count: 1699

    Hehe. There goes my mini review.

  • G D Lane
    Participant
    Post count: 2321

    ….and Hogan does have an opinion if you read his 2nd last paragraph. So, everyone has an opinion and just maybe he is pee’ed of that his opinion is not the very first?:)

  • Christo Joubert
    Participant
    Post count: 163

    I bought Thom Hogan’s e-book for my D200 and it was worth every penny – he goes into amazing detail and i learnt a huge amount from it..

    So yes, Thom Hogan rocks..

    Geoff

  • Crunchie007
    Participant
    Post count: 376

    Creeper;80896 wrote:
    Hehe. There goes my mini review.

    😀 😀

    No worries, it all adds to the background noise.

    (nice review, BTW)

  • KCLouCorbett
    Participant
    Post count: 1699

    Blue Shirt;80952 wrote:
    😀 😀

    No worries, it all adds to the background noise.

    (nice review, BTW)

    (thanks for the compliment)

  • vjgreene
    Participant
    Post count: 1345

    After having had some “funnies” on my D300, I took a few hours off this morning and went to Austen Roberts and could not replicate the overexposure I got earlier in Matrix metering. The most likely cause could have been lens or flash contacts not seating properly when fitted.

    I did download the D2X shooting profiles and are running on it now, it behaves just like my D2X would in Matrix and ended up being a very nice camera for birding.

    Auto focus on par with my D2X, although I’m still working through the new system and could possibly end up with even better results.

  • KCLouCorbett
    Participant
    Post count: 1699

    Fanie;81008 wrote:
    After having had some “funnies” on my D300, I took a few hours off this morning and went to Austen Roberts and could not replicate the overexposure I got earlier in Matrix metering. The most likely cause could have been lens or flash contacts not seating properly when fitted.

    I did download the D2X shooting profiles and are running on it now, it behaves just like my D2X would in Matrix and ended up being a very nice camera for birding.

    Auto focus on par with my D2X, although I’m still working through the new system and could possibly end up with even better results.

    Good to hear your back on track with the D300.

    As I was never privliged to have a D2x, what is so special about the profiles that you can download?

  • Troop
    Participant
    Post count: 281

    Creeper;81051 wrote:
    As I was never privliged to have a D2x, what is so special about the profiles that you can download?

    I would also like to know…..I’m battling to get set up correctly…….:eek:

  • 08daniel
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    I have had a D200 for precisely 18 months. I am very pleased with it and it is still receiving rave reviews (See the UK magazine Digital Photo December edition). I really cannot see the point of starting again with another camera, which will doubtless be replaced with a D400 in 18 months or less. Nikon have probably designed and built the D400 prototype already. Does anyone else share my view.

    Brian Mullin

  • Jola
    Participant
    Post count: 3480

    Yes, unless there is a particular feature offered by the D300 that you want / need.

    I want the slightly better high iso and I need the much better C-AF.

  • Anonymous
    Post count: 0

    @brian Mullin 81074 wrote:

    I have had a D200 for precisely 18 months. I am very pleased with it and it is still receiving rave reviews (See the UK magazine Digital Photo December edition). I really cannot see the point of starting again with another camera, which will doubtless be replaced with a D400 in 18 months or less. Nikon have probably designed and built the D400 prototype already. Does anyone else share my view.

    Brian Mullin

    I agree 100%.

    For 17 months, 29 days, 23 hours, 59 minutes a camera does everything you want it to. You’re very happy with the camera, and get darn good results with it.

    Along comes Nikon, Canon, Pentax, whoeverelse and bring out an “upgrade” on your camera, and now you’re no longer contend with your camera, and you suddenly need a function on this upgrade that you managed to live without for 17 months, 29 days, 23 hours and 59 minutes.

    Major upgrades, like going from a D80 to a D300 or to a D3X, yes by all means go for it. Just upgrading from a D80 to a D90…D200 to a D300….just wasting money IMHO.

  • KCLouCorbett
    Participant
    Post count: 1699

    Jola;81076 wrote:
    Yes, unless there is a particular feature offered by the D300 that you want / need.

    I want the slightly better high iso and I need the much better C-AF.

    …or when your other half is also a photographer and ‘borrows’ your camera for long periods.

  • Jola
    Participant
    Post count: 3480

    Creeper;81079 wrote:
    …or when your other half is also a photographer and ‘borrows’ your camera for long periods.

    At least you don’t have to hide the invoices in the ceiling under the geyser !:D

  • G D Lane
    Participant
    Post count: 2321

    Brian Mullin;81074 wrote:
    ….. Does anyone else share my view….

    Yeah, I do share your view for maybe this specific model and also have the opinion that all camera manufacturers ride the wave of digital photography in such a way whereby they create a “need to have feeling” for upgrading by punting stuff or changes that are not always a true change or must have requirement. I do also feel we have a reached stage whereby changes in future will be more towards ergonomics, accuracy of AF, colour rendition etc and this will be punted rather than the pixel race.

    However, new developments in electronics and software are still happening continuously and some of these changes will benefit a camera user. Thus considering a model jump strategy, will keep you abreast of latest changes every 3 to 4 years rather than every 2 years.

  • Missy
    Participant
    Post count: 1072

    Brian Mullin;81074 wrote:
    I have had a D200 for precisely 18 months. I am very pleased with it and it is still receiving rave reviews (See the UK magazine Digital Photo December edition). I really cannot see the point of starting again with another camera, which will doubtless be replaced with a D400 in 18 months or less. Nikon have probably designed and built the D400 prototype already. Does anyone else share my view.

    Brian Mullin

    Yes I am now with you Brian…I was expecting the D300 when the D400 is due to appear. I think the D300 is a stunner with its LCD/12 vs 10 m pixels/ AF and improved noise. I was told I needed a 2nd body for the Wedding thing. I planned to get the D300 before the big one I just did but the release in South Africa was delayed a few days and I took my hard to sell F5 along as a spare…but after reading all the washed out thingyimabobs in Matrix in the D300 …my only mode I use now I find I am all of a sudden perfectly satisfied with the D200 (and the F5 as a spare)and I’ll either use the money to go towards a 24-70 f2.8 or a 500/600 VR…ie glass first and then a camera later. Maybe there will be the longawaited D3X with say FF 16 M Pixels and 8FPS next year or an 5D FF type new model and who knows in 2 – 3 yrs the D400/500 will be here and by that time I will NEED a new cam as opposed to WANT one. I shoot with zooms for 95% of the time in Parks for their cropping and do not need a 2nd body for this and I am not averse to changing lenses in dusty conditions….but if someone gave me R13500 for my D200 including unused grip then it could be new game on but the thought of trying to set up a new camera again after Chris Van Rooyen and Albert F got the D200 to sing is just another daunting task I can do without…now who can teach me in words of 1 syllable on how to callibrate my screen!!!

  • elsahoffmann
    Moderator
    Post count: 3717

    Buy a Spyder from Hedrus, load the software, follow the instructions. very easy and worth every cent. I wasted vast quantities of photo paper before buying my spyder.

    After calibrating, just adjust screen brightness, or know how much brighter screen must look so print will match screen. You will never get a perfect match, but the spyder makes it easy to get really close.

  • Missy
    Participant
    Post count: 1072

    John Lindsay;81099 wrote:
    Buy a Spyder from Hedrus, load the software, follow the instructions. very easy and worth every cent. I wasted vast quantities of photo paper before buying my spyder.

    After calibrating, just adjust screen brightness, or know how much brighter screen must look so print will match screen. You will never get a perfect match, but the spyder makes it easy to get really close.

    Thanks John,

    I heard you have to disconnect internet connections or something…then how does one adjust screen brightness…I have a Phillips 19″ CRT Flat screen and when I got it last year it was just plugged in….oh I see there are 2 press buttons …1 has a sun on it…must be brightness….wow am i a computer boff or what!!!! Nice meeting you at the course at Hedrus’s place

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